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Curley James Weaver (March 25, 1906 - September 20, 1962) was an American blues musician, also known as Slim Gordon.

curley weaver
Biography

Early years
He was born in Covington, Georgiaand raised on a farm near Porterdale. His mother, Savannah "Dip" Shepard Weaver, was a well-respected pianist and guitarist, who taught Curley together with her friend's sons, "Barbecue Bob" Hicks and Charlie Hicks. The three formed a group with harmonica player Eddie Mapp, and played in the local area.

Early career
In 1925 Weaver moved to Atlanta, working as a laborer and playing on the streets and at various social events. In 1928, he first recorded with Columbia Records, later releasing records on several different record labels. Although he recorded on his own during the 1920s and 1930s, first in the style taught by his mother and later with the spreading Piedmont style, he was best known for duets with Blind Willie McTell - with whom he worked until the 1950s - as well as Barbecue Bob, Fred McMullen, and harmonica and guitar player Buddy Moss. He was also a member of the recording groups The Georgia Browns (Weaver, Moss, McMullen) and The Georgia Cotton Pickers (Bob, Weaver, Moss), examples of the sort of bands that played house parties in those days.

Later years
After World War II he recorded in New York and Atlanta both solo, and with McTell. His final recordings were in 1949. Weaver lost his sight in the 1950s after working on the railroad, and died of uremia in Almon, Georgia in 1962, at the age of 56.

Children
His daughter Cora Mae Bryant (born May 1, 1926) continued in her father's tradition as a blues musician until her own death in late 2008.

Source: Wiki

Georgia slide guitar wizard Curley Weaver (1906-1962) is best remembered for his lengthy association with Blind Willie McTell, one of several guitarists who are heard on a 23-track compilation of Weaver records dating from 1933-1935. This disc appeared on Document in 1992, was reissued in 2000, and again in 2005. An expressive vocalist who sang at times like Blind Boy Fuller or Blind Blake, Weaver occasionally shifted into a plaintive falsetto while dexterously manipulating his slide over the fretted neck of the guitar. His friendship with fellow Georgians Blind Buddy Keith, Nemehiah Smith, Barbecue Bob, Charlie Lincoln, and Eddie Mapp are legendary. This is only a taste of his recorded legacy; Weaver cut his first sides in 1928 and made his final recordings in 1950 with his old friend Willie McTell. Vocalist Ruth Willis, who was closely affiliated with Weaver and his circle of musical friends, is heard in a duet with him on "Some Cold Rainy Day." As is often the case with Document collections released during the '90s, there are occasional instances of poor sound quality, and tracks 15 and 16 in particular suffer from periodic distortion. Tracks 6-13 are played by the Georgia Browns, a lively little band involving guitarist Fred McMullen and Weaver's harmonica-toting pal Buddy Moss. "Tampa Strut" and "Decatur Street 81" are two of this group's choicest sides, while "Who Stole de Lock?" has a decidedly more rural feel to it than the 1932 recording by Jack Bland's Rhythmakers. Both renditions benefit from a comparison with two earlier recordings of the tune by Bryant's Jubilee Quartet, a fine gospel and secular vocal harmony group whose complete works have also been reissued by Document.