Hoodoo Hounds

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Andrew "Dr. D" Duchowski - drumsHoodoo Hounds
Matt Huddleston - guitar, vocals
David Jacobs - harmonica, keyboard, singing bowl
Walt "Hoodoo Man" Ligon - guitar, vocals
Radar Martin - bass, vocals

From the winds of Chicago, the swamps of Louisiana, and the mountains of Kentucky to the foothills of Clemson, SC the Hounds serve up their unique blend of blues with just a hint of Hoodoo. The Hoodoo Hounds are a group of professors from Clemson, SC who play the blues mostly because they just like to. They play in bars, at festivals, in back yards, and in living rooms. When they play, people come to listen, dance, drink, and share in the blues.

This album includes 12 original tracks written over the space of several years, and recorded one summer during 3 sessions. "Crossroad Blues" is a song about a blues man selling his soul to the devil for the ability to play the blues. This is a timeless story from the blues tradition inspired by Tommy Johnson, who claimed to have done exactly that. There are many references to traditional Hoodoo magic. "Picayune Moon" is a wistful song of love lost, set in the deep South of Mississippi. "Millennium Blues" is a more modern lament with a touch of jazz. "Fire In The Water" speaks directly to the Gulf oil spill and its effects on those who lived through it.

"Jail Bait Blues" is a fun little boogie about band groupies, while "Got The Blues This Morning" is traditional blues about depression. "Rita" is a song about a hurricane that rocks up the collection. "Sheepnose" is a mountain jam tune about man working on a railroad. "Daisy Mae Blues" is a rocking blues number inspired by Muddy Waters. "Let Me Be Good To You" is a sad blues song about troubled relationships. Finally, "The Singing Bowl" is about a man who doesn't trust his lover and turns to hoodoo magic only to have it backfire. It is the first known recording to use an electrified bowl to make a haunting, howling tone.

 
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