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To talking about the childhood of Jimmy D. Lane (born 1965) is to talk about The Who’s who of Chicago Blues. See Jimmy D. Lane’s father is Jimmy Lane but he used his step fathers name for a stage name. The world knows him as Jimmy Rogers. Jimmy Rogers played guitar in Muddy Waters All Stars along with Little Walter and Otis Spann. All four had their own record deals with Chess Records. Jimmy D. Lain remembers “Pops” would have his friends from work come over to the house. Friends like Muddy Waters, Little Walter, Otis Spann, Albert King, BB King, and Howlin’ Wolf . Jimmy said, as an eight year old he didn’t really know the importance of “pops” and his friends. He did not care who Howlin’ Wolf was he just wanted Mr. Burnett (Howlin’ Wolf) to not be so loud.
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Jimmy D. Lane - live photo
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Jimmy D. Lane was more interested in Jimmi Hendrix and Ceram than Jimmy Rogers and his friends. The funny thing is Hendrix, Clapton, The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin and many others of the time were looking to Jimmy’s dad and friends for their inspiration. To young Jimmy, Jimmy Rogers was just “pop” the one making him take out the garbage at night. Jimmy says he kind of came in the back door to the Chicago Blues by way of the English blues rockers. Wile still young he played around with an acoustic guitar given to him by movie star John Wayne. Jimmy went over and over his dad’s old records as  well as Muddy Waters, Albert King, Roert Lockwood Jr. and Jimi Hendrix to learn all he could from them.

After getting out of the Airborne Division in 1983 Jimmy worked construction jobs, then one day he heard Jimi Hendrix playing “Hey Joe” on the radio. From then on Jimmy D. Lane know what  he wanted to do. For the next four years Jimmy worked construction by day and studded the guitar by night.

Jimmy D. Lane had his own band and in 1987 became the lead guitarist in Jimmy Rogers Band also. This was a tuff job for Jimmy traveling to do his dad’s gigs then going back out on their brakes to tour with his band.
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The 1st record made by Jimmy D. Lane is the 1995 “Jimmy D. Lane” It has 12 songs by Jimmy and one by his dad. That’s about all I could find out about that record, it’s like the cd has vanished. In fact a lot of places call his 2nd cd “Lone Gone” his 1st cd.
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Jimmy D. Lane  - 1997 - Long Gone (cd cover)
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The 2nd record made by Jimmy D. Lane is the 1997 “Long Gone”
Personnel:
Freddie Crawford - bass
Jimmy D. Lane - vocal, guitar, tambourine
John Koenig - acoustic & electric guitars, tambourine
Also: Jim Keltner
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The first time I heard this cd I was at work and  could feel a cold was coming on. I was tired and had a sore throat. Not in the mood to work hard. Put this cd on  and a hour latter there was a smile or grin on my face, was not thinking about the sore throat, the adrenaline was pumping and a lot of work was done. This cd “Long Gone” really rocked me in to a good mood. Starting off with the Hendrix song “Hear My Train A Comin” not one of my more favorite Hendrix songs but Jimmy D. Lane does a good job of it. Then “Obsession Babies” which Lane wrote but has a good Hendrix sound to it. This is fellow by another Lane song “Lone Gone” this is more like a Stevie Ray Vaughan. like song. At this point Lane slows things down with “I Shell Be Released”. With so many Bob Dylan songs Lane could pick from he pulls out a real winner. A song everyone will know but has not been over played and your ready to hear this beautiful version Lane does. Lane’s six minute version of Muddy Waters “Rolling Stone” is great. It’s like Jimi Hendrix mixed with Robin Trower. Strong vocals and inspired guitar playing even the drummer has the Mitch Mitchell sound down. Later Jimmy D. Lane does the old John Lee Hooker song “Boom Boom”. Weather you like The Yardbirds, The Animals or the original by the man him self John Lee Hooker, Jimmy D. Lane makes it his own song with good guitar licks and a lot of power behind it. Lane throws out two more songs he has written, both good rockin blues. “Oh What A Feelin’” Jimmy again shows his strong vocals and fellows it with strong lead guitar. Sorry to say I’m not for-mill-ur with Albert Kings version of “California”. After seeing Albert’s name as composer I sure could hear his stile of playing. Lane has Albert’s guitar phrasing down so good and the feel is there too. Jimmy D. Lane opened with a Jimi Hendrix song and closes with one of his own. You get hints of both Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan. in “Tears Without A Shoulder”. Let me make this very clear when I say songs sound like Hendrix or Vaughan. Lane is not copying their licks and just replaying them, no, Lane is making completely new songs. Somewhat like Robin Trower sounded like Hendrix but by no means was he copying Hendrix songs. Robin was making completely new songs. This is true of Jimmy D. Lane also.
This whole cd shows that Lane can write good songs, sing strong, and play exceptional lead guitar with real feeling in both the voice and the strings. “Long Gone” is over ten years old and sounds just as fresh as the day it was recorded. This cd is well worth getting you will not be able to get enough of it for quit a wile.
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In 1997 wile Lane was bouncing from shows with his band and shows with Jimmy Rogers and his band they stopped in to Ocean Way Studio. Jimmy Rogers was going to recorded a new cd with some of his old friends and admirer’s. Lowell Fulson, Johnnie Johnson, Ted Harvey, John Koening, Freddie Crawford, Jimmy D. Lane, Kim Wilson, Carey Bell, Taj Mahal, Jeff Healey, Stephen Stills, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant all showed up to work with Jimmy Rogers. The Rolling Stones had booked the studio down the hall for the same days so in between working on Bridges to Babylon Mick Jagger and Keith Ritchards would run down the hall to work with Jimmy Rogers All-Star band. Jimmy D. Lane said everyone had a great time getting together and working on the record. The only sad thing was that Van Morrison really wanted to be a part of it and was unable because of previous commitments. If you have never heard this record “Blues Blues Blues” by Jimmy Rogers All-Stars you are really missing out on a great blues record. In my opinion Jimmy Rogers and Stephen Stills doing “Sweet Home Chicago” is the best song I’ve ever heard Stephen Stills do, ok how about the best blues song. Rogers and Jagger are great on “Don’t Start Me Talking” perhaps one of the best things Jagger has done in quit some time. Through all the songs on the record Jimmy D. Lane is playing guitar with all these great cats. On “Goin’ Away Baby” Rogers and Jagger are singing Kim Wilson is blowing harp, Keith Richards is playing guitar wile Jimmy D. Lane plays lead guitar. There are few people that can say they played lead guitar for Jagger and Richards.
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Jimmy D. Lane  - 1998 - Legacy
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The 3rd record made by Jimmy D. Lane is the 1998 “Legacy”
Personnel:
Per Hanson - drums
Freddie Crawford - bass
Jimmy D. Lane - guitar
Also:
Hubert Sumlin - guitar
Sam Lay - drums
Jimmy Rogers - guitar
Carey Bell - harp
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The predecessor “Long Gone” was rock n’ roll firmly in bedded in the blues. “Legacy” is the blues in bedded in rock. Lane’s blues playing is at an all time peek, song after song he keeps delivering heart felt leads with powerful vocls. The first track “Hey Little Girl” you will get to hear on the podcast, it’s a fun buggy rolling rock song to get everything going. “Clue Me” Jimmy’s got that a tuff angry voice that really makes the lyrics special. I’ve never heard Memphis Slim do “Four O’Clock in the Morning” but I can’t believe it is better than Jimmy’s version. The guitar playing is what people except out of Eric Clapton or Dickey Betts when they peek. The bad thing about the song is you know sooner or latter it has to end but for 7:09 your in heaven. “Going Downtown” is a fun up beat romp with Carey Bell giving us some good harp playing. “Another Mule Kickin’ In My Stall” is a Muddy Waters song that Jimmy D. Lane and Jimmy Rogers play together. You can almost see the two of them smiling as they play together on this fun song. For the nine minutes of “In the Bed” Jimmy and band show they can play the blues/rock like the very best of them. The drum beat stands out always right there so you can’t forget where you’re going. Carey Bell’s harp is mournful Jimmy is playing fast, slow, loud, soft and everything in-between. At the beginning of the Mercy Dee Walton song “One Room Country Shack” you hear Jimmy Rogers say he just wants to pass the ball on to his son and for him to keep the ball rolling till someone else picks it up. This is the last record Jimmy Rogers recedes two months later on December 19, 1997 he passes away. Besides the great legacy of music he passes on to us perhaps the best of the legacy is just getting started. Jimmy D. Lane is the legacy and he is standing solid. Oh the song “One Room Country Shack” like everything else on the record it’s great. The next five songs are all the some the feel the grove the playing it’s all good and that is the ending track on the record”It’s all Good”. In the podcast “It’s all Good” is just our 2nd song, hey were just getting started.
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Jimmy D. Lane - (2004) It’s Time -cd cover photo
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The 4th record made by Jimmy D. Lane is the 2004 “It’s Time”
Personnel:
Jimmy D. Lane - vocals, guitar, bass guitar, drums
Tommy Shannon - bass guitar
Chris Layton - drums
Celia Price - piano, Hammond b-3 organ
Mike Finnigan - Hammond b-3 organ
Larry Faucette – congas
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Five years had past sense the last record and it’s very obvious that Jimmy D. Lane has grown very much. Wile “Long Gone” and “Legacy” have more good songs on them than most artist will have in all their courier. “It’s Time” takes more chances than just putting out another great record of great guitar playing. This record digs deeper into the music for a more meteor blues sound. Somewhat like Jimi Hendrix when he went from “Are You Experienced” and “Axis Bold as Love” into “Electric Ladyland”. The musicianship was a lot more noticeable. Not as many sound affects, loops, feed backing and face pace songs. You really got to hear interplay of the band working with each other as musicians. Trying out different stiles of rock and blues along with different instruments.
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Jimmy and Eddie
Jimmy D. Lane and Eddie Kramer
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Eddie Kramer was brought in to produce and engineer this record. Jimmy said Eddie jumped into the project right from the beginning and it was a great help because he is so know-lige-able about producing. Jimmy is also a producer but he felt that would be like a doctor operating on him self. It’s better to bring someone in to do it for you. Eddie Kramer was also the engineer for Jimi Hendrix, Beatles “All You Need Is Love/Baby You’re a Rich Man”, Rolling Stones “Beggars Banquet”, Led Zeppelin, Kiss, Kinks, David Bowie, and many more.
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Next was the rhythm section of Tommy Shannon on bass and Chris Layton drums. Better known to most of us as Double Trouble, Stevie Ray Vaughan’s old band. Jimmy had been old friends with Stevie, Tommy and Chris back when they play at Antone’s in Austin Texas. Getting a rhythm section like this is great because Tommy and Chris have worked together for almost 25 years and for 10 years with Stevie Ray Vaughan.. Jimmy plays a lot like Stevie so Double Trouble would be a perfect fit.
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We also have Mike Finnigan on Hammond b-3 organ and Larry Faucette on congas both just happen to know Eddie Kramer from the Hendrix days. Both men had played on “Electric Ladyland”. Mike Finnigan went on to play keys with some big name’s solo artist. People like Big Brother and the Holding Compaany, Stephen Stills, Dave Mason, Peter Frampton, CSN, Rod Stewart, Buddy Guy, Ringo Starr and as always many more.
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“It’s Time” brings in different styles for a more diverse record. Jimmy gives us rock n’ blues, good old electric blues, soft laid back Blues, Chicago style acoustic blues, and just strait forward rock. The first song on this cd is the last one in the podcast. “What Makes People” is Jimmy at his best good rock n’ blues (yell, like I wont say “at his best” about another song). This first track really get you going, with a good foot stumper beat and good vocals. The next songs “‘Til I Loved You” and track 4 “Ain’t It a Pity” as well as track 6 “Stuck in the Middle” are softer blues song more beautiful than the ruff edge of the others. “‘Til I Loved You” moves at a pretty good clip wile the other two are slower. All three are beautiful songs. “Half Love” more of a blues rocker and “Bad Luck” more blues than rock both sound like Eric Clapton’s voice. Has Jimmy been learning Eric Clapton’s stile for so long he is even picking up on the voice now. Let me make this very clear we do not want any rumors starting, Eric is not on this cd. “Half Love” is in the podcast so you can judge for your self if it sounds like Eric Claption. Wile your at it also check out Jimi Hendrix like guitar playing. This is one of the things I love so much about Jimmy D. Lane how he is able to take the sounds of the people I grow up loving, mix them together and put out a completely new song that draws from them with out coping them. This is very much what Eric Claption, Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, Johnny Winter, Stevie Ray Vaughan. and so many others did with Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Elmore James and yes Jimmy Rogers. They heard something they liked changed it around and put out something new. Speaking of Elmore James (funny how that works in : - ) the best blues song on this record has got to be Elmore James’s “My Bleeding Heart”. Re-titled “Bleeding Heart” as it is also done on Jimi Hendrix’s record “War Heroes”. Jimmy D. Lane levees the other two way behind in his rendition of this song. Strong heart felt blues guitar, each note well picked and timed. He plays it soft and unhurried, later harder and quicker, with a good drum beat and beautiful organ playing, this is a real gem. This version should be a staple of any blues radio station. Unlike most long tracks (10:28) you never get bored or wish it would end. Would you like to hear something more tridental like acoustic Chicago Blues? Well you’ve come to the right place, after years of playing with the old master (Pops) Jimmy can really lay it down too. Acoustic guitar even in that Eric Claption voice, sound like your back in the fifties except for the nice cd quality. “Hand on the Door” is a fine rockers wile “24-7″ is more of the blues rocker. Each song would fit into any classic rock radio station’s play list with out a wonder as to why it is there, just why haven’t I not heard this before. Good question why haven’t we heard any of these songs on the radio? As always if you like these songs in the podcast call your radio station and tell them to play songs by Jimmy D. Lane. Tell them if they play Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page or Jagger and Richards try out the Jimmy D. Lane. He’s played with all of them and can do as good or better than any of them. Have you ever heard of a rock n blues pop hit? Neither have I but that’s the only way I know how to describe the last song. “Salina” works as a very nice ending for what I feel is an exceptional record. Jimmy’s not trying to blow you away with his last track (he just did that with “Bleeding Heart”) he’s just giving you a nice way out. When I say “Salina” could be a rock n blues pop hit. This is not meant to be disrespectful some pop songs can be good, there just more accessible to a larger grope of people. This song would appeal to a wide range of people and is just an in joy able ending to a exceptional record.
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Jimmy D. Lane
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Play list for podcast is:
1. It’s All Good - (1998) Legacy
2. Half Love - (2004) It’s Time
3. 24-7
4. ‘Til I Loved You
5. What Makes People
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Jimmy D. Lane’s records
1995 - Jimmy D. Lane
1997 - Long Gone
1998 - Legacy
2004 - It’s Time
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Jimmy D. Lane also appears on:
Jimmy Rogers “Blue Bird” 1994
Jimmy Rogers All-Stars “Blues Blues Blues” 1999
Hubert Sumlin “I Know You” 1998
Henry Townsend “My Story” 2001
Bob Margolin “All-Star Blues Jam” 2003
Ralph Bassinger “Waiting For My Train” 2007

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